Now there’s a cheese made of bacteria from human noses, belly buttons and armpits

Everyone has heard about things they wouldn’t be caught dead eating. And no matter how gross it sounds, someone is out there making a main dish out of the thing in question.

We all have come across some food that with just the smell, look or even sound, has made us gag.

Sure you can be curious and open-minded, but there has to be a limit.

I’m not really that picky and I am always open to trying something – however, no one will ever get me to try “The Human Cheese” that is now on display at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.

How openminded are you? Would you try something like bull’s testicles beer? or even Human Cheese?

Creating cheese is truly an art form. I love to eat grevé, gouda, port salut, and most cheeses out there – but some weird kinds, however, are hard to enjoy. Of course, they are rarer, but people still consider them delicacies.

Bacteria from the belly button, nose, and armpits

Now, however, there is a new cheese that will make you faint from just the thought. Christina Agapakis and Sissel Tolaas, two artists displaying in the new exhibition “The food: Bigger than a plate“ at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, have collected microbes (bacteria) from British celebrities – and then used it to produce a new cheese, NDTV reports.

It goes by the name “Selfmade” and according to the site Shared it is mainly bacteria from the belly button, nose, and armpits. When the human bacteria is added to the milk, according to the museum’s blog – it makes it curdle, creating the now-famous “Human cheese”.

The idea came from the conclusion that the bacteria commonly used in cheese production is very similar to the one found on human skin. And with this project, artists wanted to show we can use our body in cooking. It shouldn’t be as taboo as it is today, says Shared.

Below you can see a short clip about human cheese!

human cheese

Do you know someone who would try the human cheese? 

Then tag that person in the comments sections on Facebook, or share this article with your cheese-loving friends!